New Bites in the Culinary History Collection

We’ve picked up a few more followers this past weekend, so it seems like we need a bonus post this week (though what Wednesday’s feature is still a bit of a mystery). Special Collections launched this blog back in September and we’ve survived into 2012! With that in mind, it might be nice idea to give our readers an idea of the kinds of books we acquired recently. Between September and December 2011, we purchased more than 25 titles for the collection and received 12 publications as donations.

Highlights among these new acquisitions are:

  • One of a few foreign language items in the Culinary History Collection, Die Österreichische Hausfrau: Ein Handbuch für Frauen und Mädchen aller Stände; Praktische Anleitung zur Führung der Hauswirtschaft [The Austrian Housewife: A Handbook for Wives and Girls; A Practical Guide to Household Manangement] by Anna Bauer (1892);
  • Brillat-Savarin’s Physiologie du goût. A handbook of gastronomy, new and complete translation with fifty-two original etchings by A. Lalauze (1884);
  • A mid-19th century vegetarian cookbook, Vegetarian cookery by A Lady (1866?);
  • Additions to the Culinary Pamphlet Collection from Northwestern Consolidated Milling Co., William Underwood Company, and Malleable Iron Range Corporation;
  • Several publications relating to the health and care of children. Topics include whooping cough, feeding babies and children, and cookbooks designed from younger children;
  • And of course, a number of southern cookbooks!

We’re looking forward to 2012 and continuing to add new materials to the collection in all areas (and hopefully at least one NEW area)! We hope you’ll stick with us, read up on what’s new (and old) in the Culinary History, and as always, feel free to ask questions/comment!

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2 thoughts on “New Bites in the Culinary History Collection

  1. ann hertzler

    ■Several publications relating to the health and care of children. Topics include whooping cough, feeding babies and children, and cookbooks designed from younger children;
    ■And of course, a number of southern cookbooks!

    What kinds of books are these? what year?
    Are any Southern cookbooks African-American?
    thanks

  2. Here’s a short list of the publications related to children. They include children’s cookbooks, as well as publications for parents:
    -The Penny Whistle Party Planner by Meredith Brokaw & Annie Gilbar
    -Dinner from Dirt by Emily Scott and Catherine Duffy
    -The Six o’clock in the morning, worth getting up for, only seven minutes, kids of all ages fun breakfast cookbook by Chef Pierre Ange
    -Recipes especially for kids!, 2007
    -The young mother : or management of children in regard to health / by Wm. A. Alcott, 1846
    -Good teeth : how to get them and keep them, 192?
    -Feeding your baby, 192?
    -Whooping cough, 1936
    -The care of baby’s feet, c1924

    Although none of the southern cookbooks are explicitly African-American, I suspect there is some overlap. A majority of have some local/Virginia tie: -Virginia Housewife, or the Methodical Cook, 1855
    -Carolina Low Country Cooking, n.d.
    -The Elvira Henry cookbook : and momories of Elvira Henry by Miss Susan Dabney, great granddaughter of Elvira and John Henry and great great granddaughter of Patrick Henry / compiled and written by Dot Graves, 1979
    -Tidewater Virginia cook book : a collection of good, reliable recipes / by the Reid Memorial Association, of Norfolk, Va., 1891
    -Comforts of home : a book of tested receipts / by E.H.R., 1878
    -Recipe book, a manual for housekeepers : and collection of recipes contributed by the ladies of the church and many of their friends, 1900
    -Southern cooking, by Mrs. S.R. Dull …, 1928
    -Dixie meals / by Florence Roberts, 1934
    -The Southern cookbook of fine old recipes / edited by Claire S. Davidow., 1972

    We also have a number of newly cataloged local and community cookbooks, though I have not included a list here.
    -Archivist Kira

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